Remove Old Top Board Install Ribbon Connector Install New Multi Function Board

REMOVE Z80 - INSERT RIBBON CONNECTOR IN MAIN BOARD SOCKET - INSTALL Z80 IN TOP (ROM EXT.)BOARD

REMOVE Z80 - INSERT RIBBON CONNECTOR IN MAIN BOARD SOCKET - INSTALL Z80 IN TOP (ROM EXT.)BOARD

TO: THE TECH

FROM: THE GUY THAT WROTE THIS MANUAL

First of all, that little card that fell out when you opened this manual is your operator service card and we would appreciate it if you would take a couple of minutes to fill it out and send it to us with your comments. It is also a good idea to record the serial number information in the space provided at the front of this manual for future reference.

Next, this manual is not written for the "bench" technician except for the fact that we do include board layouts and schematic diagrams. As you are well aware, most of the problems incurred in the field are not board related. If you have double checked all the wiring, the power supply, the monitor, and where possible, "swapped" boards and have narrowed a problem down to the board, give us a call and our crack customer service department will get you going.

Because of solid state electronic circuitry, this game should require very little maintenance and only occasional adjustments. The majority of the problems encountered by field service technicians are of a type easily remedied, provided said technicians have at least a working knowledge of coin-operated amusement devices, the proper tools, and last but not least, a good attitude and a neat appearance.

FIRST: Approach the proprietor or attendant with a friendly greeting - "Good morning! And how are you on this fine and cheery morning?"

SECOND: List your credentials and purpose - "I'm _from__

and I understand that one of our/your amusement machines is not functioning properly." THIRD: Find out as much as possible about the problem before you approach the game -"I know that you are a busy man (or young lady) but if you would please explain exactly what the machine is doing or not doing that prompted your concern, I would be very grateful."

REMEMBER, YOU ARE A PROFESSIONAL!

Now that you've made a favorable impression and obtained a few facts, we can get down to brass tacks. (Which reminds me, be sure to check for foreign objects on the board.) When examining an ailing machine, you may want to use the following flow chart as a foundation on which to build your troubleshooting approach.

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